Bethan Customs Consultancy helps businesses grow through importing and exporting.

Based in Oldmeldrum, Aberdeen, our team provides customs support and training to businesses across the UK. We help businesses navigate their way through ever-changing customs legislation, ensuring compliance at every step. We are independent and work across all sectors, specialising in Oil & Gas, Food & Drink, Manufacturing and Construction.

Bethan works in partnership with HMRC, often being the link between HMRC and our clients. We work discretely on behalf of our clients, giving them full anonymity, if and when required.

Our services help businesses meet legislative requirements, but also offer cost savings and efficiency savings too.

Please contact us for more information.

QUALIFYING PEOPLE – DEVELOPING THE FUTURE

TÜV SÜD helps people and organisations to drive business performance to levels of excellence. We provide effective global training programmes for individuals and whole organisations to support you in becoming an expert for your industry: from work safety, management systems and technical skills to high-level executive programmes. Our training and Personal Qualification Programs cover the entire scope of safety and security aspects according to relevant norms and standards.

It’s at the tips of our fingers, at the flick of a switch, at the turn of a key, at the touch of a button.

But how often do we stop to think about where it comes from? How is the electricity we use every day to light up our houses and charge our phones generated? How does it reach us? What happens beyond the plug?

In a changing world, we all have a duty to reflect on how we can reduce our impact on the environment. Increasing our awareness of where our energy comes from and how this is set to change in the future allows us to make informed choices about energy and how we use it.

With the world changing rapidly around us, it became clear that we need to accelerate our approach to net-zero and to tell the world that we can be a big part of the solution to tackling climate change. We’re ready to help deliver net-zero and Roadmap 2035 sets out how we can do it.

How can innovative solutions bring efficiency gains? Our Efficiency Task Force showcases collaboration in action through a series of case study videos. Visit the ETF Hub for more!

Q: Tell us a bit about what you’ve done in your role as Cultural Change Champion for the industry since you were appointed?

A: We are not starting from scratch, there are already many diverse business-change journeys under way in the industry to improve cost efficiencies, productivity and margins – these are driving a range of interactions between operators, joint ventures, the supply chain and the regulator. But we want to make this more consistent across the industry.

We started out by talking with about 30 industry leaders – operators, supply chain and other key stakeholders and influencers. We wanted to hear diverse views and experiences of collaboration and cultural change, to understand how leaders see the gaps in their own companies and across the industry, and to explore examples of good and poor practices.

Desktop work identified the tools, resources and learnings that are available outside our industry, to help us move further forward. From this, we settled on a small number of key action areas to help accelerate the collaborative culture we want on the UK Continental Shelf. We are keen to tackle things somewhat differently to how it has been done in the past, in an effort to have a more sustained impact on industry performance. Our action areas are targeted at meaningful behavioural change, strong leadership and open sharing and learning from one another.

Q: What can you tell us about these key action areas?

A: One immediate action we have taken is to develop Area Plan Behavioural Guidelines. These have been written by industry, for industry, specifically through a behavioural lens. They don’t describe processes or stage-gate information and they are not a regulatory requirement. Instead, they describe how we should behave with one another to get the best outcome from area planning. We chose to focus on area plans because they are current and of real importance to delivering the MER UK strategy.

The Oil and Gas Authority’s Guidance on Area Plans provides us with the process framework, key objectives and expectations for developing Area Plans. Our industry Behavioural Guidelines are complementary to this, containing practical advice and real-life experiences in applying the right behaviours to how we work together in developing the plans. Mapped to the eight critical behaviours described in the CBQT (Collaboration Behaviour Quantification Tool), the guidelines aim to set participants up for success by sharing best practices and signposting relevant tools and resources. All three documents complement each other and should be read together. The focus now is to ensure that the guidelines are actively being used by industry.

The critical role that industry managing directors (MDs) have agreed to play – operators and supply chain alike – is to actively champion these guidelines and ensure their broad use within their organisations. Given the behavioural focus, the industry guidelines are not only applicable to area planning but also to any form of interaction between industry players. Our supply chain is a valuable source of expertise that can help deliver the necessary step-change in performance that we need – so I strongly encourage their proactive engagement and timely input.

Another key action area focuses on leaders openly sharing and learning from one another so that we can all improve. We are taking a structured approach and ensuring that our interactions are data/fact-based. We are using data and surveys to understand who is good at what and then structuring conversations between MDs without using KPIs, league tables, or being judgmental!

Recently, we used the output from the 2017 Deloitte Supply Chain Survey to have a deeper conversation with the MDs from 13 of the participating operators. With the aim of deriving maximum value from the data we already have, we shared our results with one another and talked about the systemic areas where, as operators, we need to improve. Participants helped to stimulate round-table discussion by sharing their how. Learning from one another through proactive sharing is just one example of a different way of working.

The commitment other industry leaders and I is to take the discussions further and implement positive change in behaviours in our respective companies. As MDs, we are committed to continuing these interactions between leaders and our teams. We will broaden the conversation with supply chain companies and, later this year, we plan to hold a similar MD-to-MD session using, for example, CBQT outcomes.

Sharing best practice is a broader action area for us in 2018. Initially, we will focus on organisational and human resource aspects: describing the right collaborative behaviours and emphasising their importance within our organisations. Specifically, we are interested in how best to develop these behaviours in our teams, how we measure them, how we reward the right behaviours and, conversely, how we tackle and remove poor behaviours? There are companies in our basin with clear policies, processes and structures that reinforce the development and support of strong collaboration skillsets and behaviours – we can all learn from these colleagues to help improve performance across the basin. But above all, this is an area where strong leadership is required to set expectations and follow-through with our organisations. Similarly, we will be building case studies through 2018 and 2019 with the intent to share best collaborative practice. This offers rich potential to learn about and replicate good outcomes across every part of our industry.

The final focus area is ensuring that collaboration is visible as a key enabler of Vision 2035. Oil & Gas UK is further developing the strategic roadmap to describe the what and how of the work we need to collectively deliver to attain that vision.

Q: What does this all mean for the future?

A: Our focus is on a blend of diversity, vision, processes, practices, systems and leadership – but above all, behaviours. The future success of the industry is going to be influenced greatly by the culture of the industry, and therefore by our commitment to drive behavioural change. I encourage everyone to identify, and own, the part they can play in realising this future – familiarise yourself with our plans and with the guidelines to help us deliver the enabling behaviours.

We’re seeing some really positive signs and collectively we can build on this, continuing to innovate and collaborate to increase investment in the basin and deliver value to all.

AIS Training delivers world-class specialist training for the offshore oil and gas, wind energy and industrial sectors to thousands of delegates each year.

From state-of-the-art industrial training facilities throughout the UK, it offers a comprehensive portfolio of mandatory and optional skills, competency and safety courses endorsed by the world’s leading trade associations including IRATA, OPITO, SPRAT, MCA, IOSH, ECITB, CompEx, GWO and RenewableUK.

OPITO is a not-for-profit, industry-owned organisation which works with employers and employee groups to set and monitor training and competence standards for the global offshore oil and gas industry.

OPITO works in partnership with approved training providers to ensure that the delivery of key safety and emergency training meets the required industry standards and maintains a database of personnel training details which can be accessed worldwide by employers. OPITO training and certification is recognised in the majority of regions where the oil & gas industry operates, helping avoid duplicate training. OPITO works in partnership with employers to develop and approve systems designed to prove the competence of their employees.

The International Safety Training College currently operates two leading centres in Malta and Libya which provide consultancy and training to the highest professional standards in fire fighting, emergency response, disaster management, offshore and marine survival, fire safety, health & safety and first aid. ISTC is Malta’s pre-eminent training centre focusing upon emergency response, disaster management, health, safety and the environment.

The unique training facilities offered by the company have been specifically designed to satisfy the learning outcomes required for the aviation, oil and gas, and marine industries, amongst others. These facilities are contained within a large incident ground where risk critical training is undertaken on a daily basis.

Services include design and testing of emergency and disaster management plans, training needs analysis and subsequent training delivery, risk assessments, and health & safety audits.

The Engineering Construction Industry Training Board (ECITB) is the statutory skills body for the Engineering Construction Industry (ECI) in Great Britain. A non-departmental public body (NDPB) sponsored by the Department for Education (DfE), the ECITB works with employers to attract, develop and qualify the engineering construction workforce in a wide range of craft, technical and professional disciplines.

The ECITB is accountable to parliament and funded by a levy that it is required to collect from the industry. The levy is used to support employers train and upskill their workforce to industry standards, develop qualifications and courses that meet employer needs, and regulate a network of approved training providers. The ECITB is also accredited as an Awarding Organisation by the Office of the Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), Qualifications Wales and the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA).

Clyde Training Solutions (CTS) is a custom-built training centre on the banks of the River Clyde in Clydebank, with the award of becoming an OPITO approved training centre in late December 2016. We are currently the only centre in central Scotland certified to provide Marine, Offshore and Renewables Safety Training.

Recently we obtained approval to run the OPITO HOIT – Helicopter Operations Initial Training.

 

Maersk Training shows organisations, crews and individuals in the Oil & Gas, Maritime and Wind industry how to improve safety and operational performance, in offshore and maritime operations. We always train as close to real life as possible, teaching you how to handle challenging situations.

Maersk Training covers a wide field of offshore industries and training needs, targeting each field with specific expertise. But we always teach and train according to our basic values, a Maersk Training way of thinking with “Uprightness, Humbleness and Constant Care” in mind.

As an organisation that incorporates both men and women’s perspectives, AXIS Network is promoting the concept of ‘better gender balance for better business’ in the industry.

It was when Jenny Junnier returned to work after becoming a mum in 2008 that the issue of gender balance and her role in cultivating diversity and supporting her peers really began to crystallise in her mind.

“Until then I’d been largely oblivious to the issue, but when I got back to work I started to think about what I wanted to do next,” she explains. “I began to see the value of becoming a role model: a professional person, determined to realise my potential in my career while also being a parent. I began to research the issue of gender diversity and joined a women’s network at my then employer.”

Now an Aberdeen-based senior audit manager at Deloitte, she believes it is a no-brainer that “with better gender diversity and balance you get better business”. It is this ethos that forms the bedrock of the Aberdeen X-Industry Support (AXIS) Network that she co-founded in 2014.

At that time, the fledgling network initially involved just a few like-minded individuals, but since then has grown to a membership of more than 600 people from 160 organisations. The group’s drive is to achieve gender balance in the workplace and to pursue very practical measures to achieve that goal. Its activities include networking and development events as well as role model/mentoring programmes. It also provides a personal support environment and an online community forum.

One of the key features of the network is that it isn’t a women-only environment – there are two men on the committee and around 20 per cent of the membership is male. “We’re trying to make the industry a better place for both men and women to work in. It has to work well for both genders if it’s going to work at all,” notes Jenny.

“We share a passion for making a difference and while we’re proud to have achieved a great deal, we believe we can do even more. We always want people selected on the basis of the best person for the job. Improving the gender balance means more emphasis on targeting women to encourage them to apply for roles. It also means supporting women inside organisations and developing a pipeline of talented women, so there are more potential applicants.”

Step Change in Safety is a not-for-profit, member-led organisation which aims to make the UK the safest oil province in the world to work in. It brings together operators and contractors, trade unions, regulators and the onshore and offshore workforce to raise safety standards, share good practice and communicate facts so that no-one becomes complacent about staying safe.

It also provides guidelines and resources for individuals and member companies to help foster safety culture and compliance.

Brexit and the UK oil and gas industry

Oil & Gas UK provides evidence-based insights on behalf of our members to a range of stakeholders that includes both the Westminster and Holyrood governments and parliaments, the media and internationally. Through our research, and soundings taken of our membership, we know that the top priorities for the UK oil and gas sector post-Brexit include:

  1. Protecting the offshore industry from future EU regulatory changes: As the largest EU producer of offshore oil and gas, the UK takes a leading role at the EU decision making table in support of our industry. Future changes to regulations or directives by EU institutions could negatively impact the UK oil and gas industry even after Brexit. Therefore, Oil & Gas UK is asking  the Government to ensure there is a mechanism in place that provides support to the UKCS in relation to future EU rules.
  2. Maintaining a strong voice in Europe: Whether the UK participates in any  future EU Governance framework or not, a forward-looking European energy policy needs to recognise that oil and gas will remain a key part of both the UK and the EU’s energy mix for decades to come.
  3. Minimal friction between the UK and EU: Although the UK’s oil and gas sector has a global reach, it has a significant and valuable supply chain that sources much of its’ goods and services from the EU. Our industry needs certainty and predictability to deliver its operations safely and efficiently and as such, ensuring the efficient and frictionless movement of goods, services and capital must remain a priority.
  4. Protecting energy trading and the internal energy market: The internal market has provided significant benefits to the UK in terms of competitiveness and security of supply.  After Brexit, it will be essential to maintain the commercial and regulatory integrity of any new internal energy market spanning the EU and UK.
  5. Protecting our licence to operate: Meeting the future energy needs of Europe while tackling climate change is important and any forward-looking energy policy needs to recognise that oil and gas will remain a key part of both the UK and the continent’s energy mix for decades to come.

Stakeholder & Communications –  Tom Evans / tevans@oilandgasuk.co.uk.

*The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy has published guidance on preparing for no-deal Brexit. Please follow this link for further information.

Tomorrow’s best ideas, innovation and improvements will come from bringing diverse minds together.

At OGUK, we are proud of our inclusive and diverse workplace, built on our principles of honesty, integrity and respect. We strive to create a work environment that accommodates everyone and promotes development and opportunities for all employees.

Diversity is more than just policies and practices – it is at the heart of our organisation. We know that simply having a diverse workforce is not enough; we want to create an inclusive environment where everyone can contribute their best work, and develop their full potential, while remaining true to themselves.

test

Embracing the energy transition

Amid calls for divestment and growing commitments to decarbonise energy, many are questioning the future of the oil and gas industry. The reality however, is that fossil fuels will play a key part in the quest to become more sustainable.

 

 

A sector-specific programme designed to help businesses plan and deliver growth, F4E has been developed by Robert Gordon University (RGU) in close collaboration with Energy Industries Council (EIC) and Opportunity North East (ONE), as well as top tier industry partners who hold invaluable sector insight. It provides a collaborative, integrated community of support to businesses. Companies will gain access to new thinking to support their ability to scale, innovate and internationalise.

 

RGU Fit 4 Energy

JIP33

Bethan Customs Consultancy

Bethan Customs Consultancy helps businesses grow through importing and exporting.

Based in Oldmeldrum, Aberdeen, our team provides customs support and training to businesses across the UK. We help businesses navigate their way through ever-changing customs legislation, ensuring compliance at every step. We are independent and work across all sectors, specialising in Oil & Gas, Food & Drink, Manufacturing and Construction.

Bethan works in partnership with HMRC, often being the link between HMRC and our clients. We work discretely on behalf of our clients, giving them full anonymity, if and when required.

Our services help businesses meet legislative requirements, but also offer cost savings and efficiency savings too.

Please contact us for more information.

TUV SUD National Engineering Laboratory

QUALIFYING PEOPLE – DEVELOPING THE FUTURE

TÜV SÜD helps people and organisations to drive business performance to levels of excellence. We provide effective global training programmes for individuals and whole organisations to support you in becoming an expert for your industry: from work safety, management systems and technical skills to high-level executive programmes. Our training and Personal Qualification Programs cover the entire scope of safety and security aspects according to relevant norms and standards.

Do you know your energy?

It’s at the tips of our fingers, at the flick of a switch, at the turn of a key, at the touch of a button.

But how often do we stop to think about where it comes from? How is the electricity we use every day to light up our houses and charge our phones generated? How does it reach us? What happens beyond the plug?

In a changing world, we all have a duty to reflect on how we can reduce our impact on the environment. Increasing our awareness of where our energy comes from and how this is set to change in the future allows us to make informed choices about energy and how we use it.

Our Vision. Our Future

With the world changing rapidly around us, it became clear that we need to accelerate our approach to net-zero and to tell the world that we can be a big part of the solution to tackling climate change. We’re ready to help deliver net-zero and Roadmap 2035 sets out how we can do it.

Efficiency Task Force

How can innovative solutions bring efficiency gains? Our Efficiency Task Force showcases collaboration in action through a series of case study videos. Visit the ETF Hub for more!

A champion for change: Q&A with Steve Phimister

Q: Tell us a bit about what you’ve done in your role as Cultural Change Champion for the industry since you were appointed?

A: We are not starting from scratch, there are already many diverse business-change journeys under way in the industry to improve cost efficiencies, productivity and margins – these are driving a range of interactions between operators, joint ventures, the supply chain and the regulator. But we want to make this more consistent across the industry.

We started out by talking with about 30 industry leaders – operators, supply chain and other key stakeholders and influencers. We wanted to hear diverse views and experiences of collaboration and cultural change, to understand how leaders see the gaps in their own companies and across the industry, and to explore examples of good and poor practices.

Desktop work identified the tools, resources and learnings that are available outside our industry, to help us move further forward. From this, we settled on a small number of key action areas to help accelerate the collaborative culture we want on the UK Continental Shelf. We are keen to tackle things somewhat differently to how it has been done in the past, in an effort to have a more sustained impact on industry performance. Our action areas are targeted at meaningful behavioural change, strong leadership and open sharing and learning from one another.

Q: What can you tell us about these key action areas?

A: One immediate action we have taken is to develop Area Plan Behavioural Guidelines. These have been written by industry, for industry, specifically through a behavioural lens. They don’t describe processes or stage-gate information and they are not a regulatory requirement. Instead, they describe how we should behave with one another to get the best outcome from area planning. We chose to focus on area plans because they are current and of real importance to delivering the MER UK strategy.

The Oil and Gas Authority’s Guidance on Area Plans provides us with the process framework, key objectives and expectations for developing Area Plans. Our industry Behavioural Guidelines are complementary to this, containing practical advice and real-life experiences in applying the right behaviours to how we work together in developing the plans. Mapped to the eight critical behaviours described in the CBQT (Collaboration Behaviour Quantification Tool), the guidelines aim to set participants up for success by sharing best practices and signposting relevant tools and resources. All three documents complement each other and should be read together. The focus now is to ensure that the guidelines are actively being used by industry.

The critical role that industry managing directors (MDs) have agreed to play – operators and supply chain alike – is to actively champion these guidelines and ensure their broad use within their organisations. Given the behavioural focus, the industry guidelines are not only applicable to area planning but also to any form of interaction between industry players. Our supply chain is a valuable source of expertise that can help deliver the necessary step-change in performance that we need – so I strongly encourage their proactive engagement and timely input.

Another key action area focuses on leaders openly sharing and learning from one another so that we can all improve. We are taking a structured approach and ensuring that our interactions are data/fact-based. We are using data and surveys to understand who is good at what and then structuring conversations between MDs without using KPIs, league tables, or being judgmental!

Recently, we used the output from the 2017 Deloitte Supply Chain Survey to have a deeper conversation with the MDs from 13 of the participating operators. With the aim of deriving maximum value from the data we already have, we shared our results with one another and talked about the systemic areas where, as operators, we need to improve. Participants helped to stimulate round-table discussion by sharing their how. Learning from one another through proactive sharing is just one example of a different way of working.

The commitment other industry leaders and I is to take the discussions further and implement positive change in behaviours in our respective companies. As MDs, we are committed to continuing these interactions between leaders and our teams. We will broaden the conversation with supply chain companies and, later this year, we plan to hold a similar MD-to-MD session using, for example, CBQT outcomes.

Sharing best practice is a broader action area for us in 2018. Initially, we will focus on organisational and human resource aspects: describing the right collaborative behaviours and emphasising their importance within our organisations. Specifically, we are interested in how best to develop these behaviours in our teams, how we measure them, how we reward the right behaviours and, conversely, how we tackle and remove poor behaviours? There are companies in our basin with clear policies, processes and structures that reinforce the development and support of strong collaboration skillsets and behaviours – we can all learn from these colleagues to help improve performance across the basin. But above all, this is an area where strong leadership is required to set expectations and follow-through with our organisations. Similarly, we will be building case studies through 2018 and 2019 with the intent to share best collaborative practice. This offers rich potential to learn about and replicate good outcomes across every part of our industry.

The final focus area is ensuring that collaboration is visible as a key enabler of Vision 2035. Oil & Gas UK is further developing the strategic roadmap to describe the what and how of the work we need to collectively deliver to attain that vision.

Q: What does this all mean for the future?

A: Our focus is on a blend of diversity, vision, processes, practices, systems and leadership – but above all, behaviours. The future success of the industry is going to be influenced greatly by the culture of the industry, and therefore by our commitment to drive behavioural change. I encourage everyone to identify, and own, the part they can play in realising this future – familiarise yourself with our plans and with the guidelines to help us deliver the enabling behaviours.

We’re seeing some really positive signs and collectively we can build on this, continuing to innovate and collaborate to increase investment in the basin and deliver value to all.

AIS Training

AIS Training delivers world-class specialist training for the offshore oil and gas, wind energy and industrial sectors to thousands of delegates each year.

From state-of-the-art industrial training facilities throughout the UK, it offers a comprehensive portfolio of mandatory and optional skills, competency and safety courses endorsed by the world’s leading trade associations including IRATA, OPITO, SPRAT, MCA, IOSH, ECITB, CompEx, GWO and RenewableUK.

OPITO

OPITO is a not-for-profit, industry-owned organisation which works with employers and employee groups to set and monitor training and competence standards for the global offshore oil and gas industry.

OPITO works in partnership with approved training providers to ensure that the delivery of key safety and emergency training meets the required industry standards and maintains a database of personnel training details which can be accessed worldwide by employers. OPITO training and certification is recognised in the majority of regions where the oil & gas industry operates, helping avoid duplicate training. OPITO works in partnership with employers to develop and approve systems designed to prove the competence of their employees.

International Safety Training College

The International Safety Training College currently operates two leading centres in Malta and Libya which provide consultancy and training to the highest professional standards in fire fighting, emergency response, disaster management, offshore and marine survival, fire safety, health & safety and first aid. ISTC is Malta’s pre-eminent training centre focusing upon emergency response, disaster management, health, safety and the environment.

The unique training facilities offered by the company have been specifically designed to satisfy the learning outcomes required for the aviation, oil and gas, and marine industries, amongst others. These facilities are contained within a large incident ground where risk critical training is undertaken on a daily basis.

Services include design and testing of emergency and disaster management plans, training needs analysis and subsequent training delivery, risk assessments, and health & safety audits.

ECITB

The Engineering Construction Industry Training Board (ECITB) is the statutory skills body for the Engineering Construction Industry (ECI) in Great Britain. A non-departmental public body (NDPB) sponsored by the Department for Education (DfE), the ECITB works with employers to attract, develop and qualify the engineering construction workforce in a wide range of craft, technical and professional disciplines.

The ECITB is accountable to parliament and funded by a levy that it is required to collect from the industry. The levy is used to support employers train and upskill their workforce to industry standards, develop qualifications and courses that meet employer needs, and regulate a network of approved training providers. The ECITB is also accredited as an Awarding Organisation by the Office of the Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual), Qualifications Wales and the Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA).

Clyde Training Solutions

Clyde Training Solutions (CTS) is a custom-built training centre on the banks of the River Clyde in Clydebank, with the award of becoming an OPITO approved training centre in late December 2016. We are currently the only centre in central Scotland certified to provide Marine, Offshore and Renewables Safety Training.

Recently we obtained approval to run the OPITO HOIT – Helicopter Operations Initial Training.

 

Maersk Training

Maersk Training shows organisations, crews and individuals in the Oil & Gas, Maritime and Wind industry how to improve safety and operational performance, in offshore and maritime operations. We always train as close to real life as possible, teaching you how to handle challenging situations.

Maersk Training covers a wide field of offshore industries and training needs, targeting each field with specific expertise. But we always teach and train according to our basic values, a Maersk Training way of thinking with “Uprightness, Humbleness and Constant Care” in mind.

AXIS Network

As an organisation that incorporates both men and women’s perspectives, AXIS Network is promoting the concept of ‘better gender balance for better business’ in the industry.

It was when Jenny Junnier returned to work after becoming a mum in 2008 that the issue of gender balance and her role in cultivating diversity and supporting her peers really began to crystallise in her mind.

“Until then I’d been largely oblivious to the issue, but when I got back to work I started to think about what I wanted to do next,” she explains. “I began to see the value of becoming a role model: a professional person, determined to realise my potential in my career while also being a parent. I began to research the issue of gender diversity and joined a women’s network at my then employer.”

Now an Aberdeen-based senior audit manager at Deloitte, she believes it is a no-brainer that “with better gender diversity and balance you get better business”. It is this ethos that forms the bedrock of the Aberdeen X-Industry Support (AXIS) Network that she co-founded in 2014.

At that time, the fledgling network initially involved just a few like-minded individuals, but since then has grown to a membership of more than 600 people from 160 organisations. The group’s drive is to achieve gender balance in the workplace and to pursue very practical measures to achieve that goal. Its activities include networking and development events as well as role model/mentoring programmes. It also provides a personal support environment and an online community forum.

One of the key features of the network is that it isn’t a women-only environment – there are two men on the committee and around 20 per cent of the membership is male. “We’re trying to make the industry a better place for both men and women to work in. It has to work well for both genders if it’s going to work at all,” notes Jenny.

“We share a passion for making a difference and while we’re proud to have achieved a great deal, we believe we can do even more. We always want people selected on the basis of the best person for the job. Improving the gender balance means more emphasis on targeting women to encourage them to apply for roles. It also means supporting women inside organisations and developing a pipeline of talented women, so there are more potential applicants.”

Step Change in Safety

Step Change in Safety is a not-for-profit, member-led organisation which aims to make the UK the safest oil province in the world to work in. It brings together operators and contractors, trade unions, regulators and the onshore and offshore workforce to raise safety standards, share good practice and communicate facts so that no-one becomes complacent about staying safe.

It also provides guidelines and resources for individuals and member companies to help foster safety culture and compliance.

Brexit and the UK oil and gas industry

Brexit and the UK oil and gas industry

Oil & Gas UK provides evidence-based insights on behalf of our members to a range of stakeholders that includes both the Westminster and Holyrood governments and parliaments, the media and internationally. Through our research, and soundings taken of our membership, we know that the top priorities for the UK oil and gas sector post-Brexit include:

  1. Protecting the offshore industry from future EU regulatory changes: As the largest EU producer of offshore oil and gas, the UK takes a leading role at the EU decision making table in support of our industry. Future changes to regulations or directives by EU institutions could negatively impact the UK oil and gas industry even after Brexit. Therefore, Oil & Gas UK is asking  the Government to ensure there is a mechanism in place that provides support to the UKCS in relation to future EU rules.
  2. Maintaining a strong voice in Europe: Whether the UK participates in any  future EU Governance framework or not, a forward-looking European energy policy needs to recognise that oil and gas will remain a key part of both the UK and the EU’s energy mix for decades to come.
  3. Minimal friction between the UK and EU: Although the UK’s oil and gas sector has a global reach, it has a significant and valuable supply chain that sources much of its’ goods and services from the EU. Our industry needs certainty and predictability to deliver its operations safely and efficiently and as such, ensuring the efficient and frictionless movement of goods, services and capital must remain a priority.
  4. Protecting energy trading and the internal energy market: The internal market has provided significant benefits to the UK in terms of competitiveness and security of supply.  After Brexit, it will be essential to maintain the commercial and regulatory integrity of any new internal energy market spanning the EU and UK.
  5. Protecting our licence to operate: Meeting the future energy needs of Europe while tackling climate change is important and any forward-looking energy policy needs to recognise that oil and gas will remain a key part of both the UK and the continent’s energy mix for decades to come.

Stakeholder & Communications –  Tom Evans / tevans@oilandgasuk.co.uk.

*The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy has published guidance on preparing for no-deal Brexit. Please follow this link for further information.

Diversity & Inclusion

Tomorrow’s best ideas, innovation and improvements will come from bringing diverse minds together.

At OGUK, we are proud of our inclusive and diverse workplace, built on our principles of honesty, integrity and respect. We strive to create a work environment that accommodates everyone and promotes development and opportunities for all employees.

Diversity is more than just policies and practices – it is at the heart of our organisation. We know that simply having a diverse workforce is not enough; we want to create an inclusive environment where everyone can contribute their best work, and develop their full potential, while remaining true to themselves.

test

test

Energy Transition

Embracing the energy transition

Amid calls for divestment and growing commitments to decarbonise energy, many are questioning the future of the oil and gas industry. The reality however, is that fossil fuels will play a key part in the quest to become more sustainable.

RGU – Fit 4 Energy

 

 

A sector-specific programme designed to help businesses plan and deliver growth, F4E has been developed by Robert Gordon University (RGU) in close collaboration with Energy Industries Council (EIC) and Opportunity North East (ONE), as well as top tier industry partners who hold invaluable sector insight. It provides a collaborative, integrated community of support to businesses. Companies will gain access to new thinking to support their ability to scale, innovate and internationalise.

 

RGU Fit 4 Energy

IOGP – Design tools & initiatives

JIP33