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East of England Energy Group  works closely with major companies in the region and industry to ensure that tender and project opportunities are shared with members.

More information is available at http://www.eeegr.com/what-we-do.html#supply

NOF Energy organises a range of events to help companies meet and discuss business opportunities.

More information is available at this link  here http://www.nofenergy.co.uk/n25-events.html

The UK Government’s Department for International Trade provides support for exporters and inward investors.

More information is available at this link here https://www.great.gov.uk/uk/

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy  provides information on support and finance for your business

More information is available at this link here – https://www.gov.uk/business-finance-support

Collaboration and efficiency are becoming more commonplace in the mindset and vocabulary of the UK oil and gas industry, a key conference heard today.

The sector has worked hard over the last two years to bring efficiency to the fore, the Oil and Gas Industry Conference in Aberdeen was told.

While the approach to adapt to our new competitive reality was borne of “sheer necessity, in response to changing economic realities, Walter Thain, who chairs industry’s Efficiency Task Force (ETF) and is Managing Director of Petrofac, told the Oil & Gas UK event: “These new ways of working are starting to become embedded in our approach and it’s delivering results.”

Efficiency and its competitive advantage was one of the themes at the conference which also saw the launch of a new Efficiency Hub – on the Oil & Gas UK website – a one-stop shop for industry efficiency initiatives.

The new hub will encourage companies across the UK Continental Shelf to share examples of improvements made within their organisations, download and pilot efficiency ‘tools’ launched by the ETF, and keep abreast of the latest advances in industry efficiency.

Another key theme of conference was the huge potential of Vision 2035 – a £290-billion opportunity for the UK oil and gas industry that could extend the life of the basin and deliver a much-needed for boost the supply chain.

The First Minister for Scotland Nicola Sturgeon MSP – one of the conference keynote speakers – gave her backing to Oil & Gas UK’s blueprint for the next UK Government said the North Sea would continue to produce for decades to come.

Other areas of discussion at conference included the use of technology in industry and how other sectors are deploying big data and digitalisation to transform and reduce costs, the importance of supply chain collaboration on areas of skills to reduce duplication and ensure clarity and the role oil and gas can play in a low carbon future.

An investment stimulation session heard that that as mergers and acquisition activity continues, industry could expect more creativity from buyers and sellers to make the deal happen.

Elsewhere there were calls for the supply chain to diversify across the energy industry and not just service oil and gas. There was also appetite for a sector deal for the industry.

Conference was also told that industry had two choices when more activity returns to the basin – slip back into its old ways and old habits, or totally change its mindset.

Oil & Gas UK Chief Executive Deirdre Michie told conference in her opening address: “This time we have an opportunity to do things differently – especially if we remind ourselves that we have all been part of the problem and therefore we all need – including the cynics – to be part of the solution too.”

Almost 400 delegates attended the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre event which had Total as principal sponsor.

“The conference has demonstrated that we have a committed industry, and despite the issues it has to deal with, continues to strive to improve its competitiveness and sustain its contribution to the UK economy,” added Ms Michie.

Submitted by Tom Brown, Technical Sales Manager.

Problem statement

  • A Northern North Sea asset had to replace a 2’’ stainless steel fuel gas system which ran through both hazardous and non-hazardous areas.
  • The system therefore had to be ‘fully welded’.
  • The only way they could do this under traditional methods was to weld the pipe on the platform.
  • This was not possible due to the spacing restrictions in this instance.

Aims

  • To replace the system as a fully welded one so the non-hazardous areas could remain this way, without actually welding on site.

 

Method

  • The operator had used Lokring before on fuel gas, but was not sure if it could be used on a fully welded system in a non-hazardous area without reclassifying the area as hazardous, as would have to be done when installing a flange.
  • To get confirmation, the operator contracted Xodus to carry out a study on whether a Lokring coupling could be used in this situation while maintaining the non-hazardous area classification.

Impact

  • The findings of the report confirm that;
  • ‘There is strong, well-supported justification for the use of LOKRING fittings in place of welded connections on the fuel gas system located in a non-hazardous area. The work completed for this study is judged to have suitably justified weld-equivalence for LOKRING fittings in non-hazardous areas, which by inference facilitates the support of their use in hazardous areas also.’

How does this relate to the Oil and Gas industry?

  • Traditionally, when installing fully welded pipework, the only option in non hazardous areas of a platform have been to weld on site.
  • This takes time, involves hot work permits, welders, habitats, fire watch and there is always the safety risk welding on site
  • This study has now provided another option to welding fully welded systems, while at the same time being quicker, safer and more cost effective.

 

Submitted by Kevin Milne, Business Development & Brand Manager. 

Problem Statement

Utilisation of dive support vessels (DSVs) to fix and repair subsea structures on fixed assets is time sensitive, expensive and often inaccurate. Application of the principles of subsea standardisation/fit for purpose offers the potential to test interventions which do not involve DSVs.

Aims

  • Apply the principles of subsea standardisation to brace repairs and identify a fit-for-purpose approach.
  • De-risk an alternative intervention both commercially and technically in order to deliver the most efficient solution to meet the client’s requirement.
  • Reduce operational expenditure (OpEx) by challenging typical approach and methods.

 

Method

  • The SETS team worked with the project team early on to review the project scope and applied the standardisation principles to identify opportunities for improvement. The scope was then revisited and re-worked with a more realistic consideration of risk.
  • A focus on commercial risk was introduced.

Impact

Early involvement and application of a standardised/’fit-for-purpose’ approach resulted in:

  • Elimination of non-productive time
  • Consideration of all technical and commercial contingencies before the DSV left the harbour wall
  • Reduction of DSV requirement by 11 days
  • Work-scope successfully delivered with considerable cost and time savings.

Total hours saved: 264

Total savings anticipated: £1m +

Problem statement

Correcting the slippage of buoyancy modules on the Global Producer III FPSO vessel’s risers without replacing the riser or carrying out a planned shutdown is an extremely expensive and risky operation.  The challenge was to find a way to correct this slippage whilst keeping the riser in operation, something that hadn’t been done before.

Aim

To correct the buoyancy module slippage in a targeted manner using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), allowing us to move away from conducting saturation diving operations and also engineer a solution that could be implemented whilst in operation.

 

Method

  • The Maersk Oil team engaged with SubC Partner, inventor and owner of the technical solution. Over six months, the team created a bespoke tool that connected to an ROV.
  • The tool had to be specifically designed for the task because there were a number of specific requirements.
  • It had to work underwater while connected to the ROV, dock onto the riser and remove the old buoyancy module and inner clamp. It had then to bring the old parts to the surface, pick up the new clamp and module and go back down to the riser to install the new parts.
  • The new clamp was also installed with rubber compliant pads to stop future slippage, a technique already effectively used by Maersk Oil.

Impact

  • Replacing the buoyancy modules on a live riser system had never successfully been completed before. The Maersk Oil team met this challenge head on and in collaboration with SubC Partner, a bespoke tool was developed to replace the buoyancy modules, correcting the slippage.
  • The solution avoided the need to replace the whole riser, an extremely expensive and risky operation, and also meant that the riser could be kept in operation during the replacement, resulting in no production loss.
  • By using a tool docked onto an ROV the need for saturation diving personnel was eradicated, reducing the risk to human life.
  • The installation of rubber compliant pads on the inner clamp helps prevent future slippage.
  • Replacing the buoyancy modules is more efficient compared to the alternative of replacing the riser entirely; there was no impact to production and the solution saw around 80% savings compared to alternative method. This solution has been shared at a Society for Underwater Technology (SUT) lecture.

Total hours saved: No significant saving

Total savings anticipated: Solution cost approx. 20% of the average fee of replacing a riser, around 80% saving.

Submitted by Philip Oliver, Transformational Change Manager. 

Problem statement

Inclement weather, intermittent accessibility and poor control of environment can negatively affect schedule and drive up costs for planned/unplanned activities. Inflexible access solutions are a significant factor that contributes to delays in these scenarios.

Aims

  • Develop an optimised approach to each access situation that ensures safety and maximises tool time.
  • Assure greater integrity and reliability by creating a consistent environment.
  • Challenge conventional approaches to access solutions.

 

 

Method

Each scope is approached with a thorough and detailed focus on identifying the optimum solutions, considering aspects that include the work environment, the nature of the work, avoiding working at height, workface planning, remote operated aerial vehicle (ROAV) usage and area cover. The purchasing of multiple ‘Safezone’ positive pressure habitats ensures that we are not bottlenecked on resources and rapidly deploy the system on our clients’ assets when required.

Impact

Through challenging conventional approaches to access solutions we were able to ensure significant savings on material cost, improved safety and increased tool time.  Project successes have included an 85 percent saving on the inspection of 143 pipe supports and £1.68 million client saving  when using a remote operated aerial vehicle (ROAV) instead of rope access solutions. The use of a ROAV also allowed for avoidance of a three-week shutdown, scaffolding, rope access and over-side working

Total hours saved: Three-week shutdown

Total savings anticipated: £1.68m

Submitted by Philip Oliver, Transformational Change Manager.

Problem Statement

Breaking flanges to physically isolate systems when decommissioning is time intensive and introduces the risk of disturbing asbestos present in compressed asbestos fibre (CAF) type gaskets

Aims

  • Reduce personnel asbestos exposure and minimise the requirement for asbestos removal specialists when breaking flanges during decommissioning.
  • Reduce the time required for providing positive isolations during decommissioning.

Method

To solve the issue, our decommissioning services contract proposed using  the Springlynn system, a self-tapping saddle for draining and venting systems adopted from the water industry.

Impact

The system has been simple to use and can be deployed by someone with no previous training. It removes the need to break flanges but ensures that re-energisation of the pipeline cannot occur. The system eliminates potential risk of exposure from asbestos fibre (CAF) gaskets.

Submitted by Lakshan Saldin

Problem statement

Multinational project needed to run workshop to review issues and  uncertainties with participants from multiple nationalities and across multiple specialisms, taking as little time as possible.

 

Aims

Develop a comprehensive, shared picture of project risk and uncertainty across a diverse group of participants and identify the critical factors affecting project within a very short timescale.

Method

Developed a workshop combining elements of the Delphi technique for developing consensus in expert groups with  an agile estimating methodology to gather diverse views.

Participants worked through a list of keywords and “played” a numbered card for each one, low numbers indicated an insignificant issue and high numbers a significant issue. For issues flagged as significant by one or more participants, a simple consensus based process was used to agree and capture outcomes. Initial output was available the same day.

Impact

The multinational, multilingual project team was able to challenge assumptions, recognise cognitive bias (e.g. anchoring, groupthink) and develop a shared understanding of project issues in a low conflict environment.

Material uncertainties affecting project delivery were identified early on and incorporated into execution plan.

Improved understanding of issues/threats through introduction of new information & perspectives.

Short duration enable participation from normally difficult to get hold of individuals.

Submitted by Philip Oliver (Transformational Change Manager)

Problem statement

Keeping costs of maintaining ageing assets under
control prior to cessation of production (CoP), while maintaining integrity.

Aims

  • Evaluate work scopes to offer alternative solutions to client’s benefit.
  • Reduce maintenance scope of various projects in a late-life asset management context.

Method

As part of ongoing evaluation of work scopes, a
thorough review was carried out of a fabric maintenance programme to maintain platform integrity. Two opportunities were identified to either reduce or remove the painting scope. The proposed reduction required engagement with the client’s technical authorities to agree to a deviation on painting standards, which are written for operating assets and are not always appropriate for assets coming to the end of their field life.

Impact

A 42 per cent reduction in work scope was realised. The drilling derrick painting scope was reduced considerably by using wax oil instead of normal paint. As this took less time to complete, the job could be carried out during a planned drilling outage, saving an additional £1,120,000 (cost of drilling downtime for original scope).

Total days saved: 27

Total savings anticipated: £2.16m

 

Inventory Management Tools

Guidelines – Inventory Management Good Practice

Coming soon – estimated 2017

Register your interest

Problem Statement
An alternative method for inspecting flexible hoses on the Gryphon Alpha Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel’s turret, which removes the need to use radiography was needed. Radiography cannot be carried out in the direction of the asset’s nucleonic detectors as this will trip the high-integrity pressure protection system (HIPPS) and cause an unplanned production outage. The entire turret area needs to be shut off to personnel during scanning as it poses a significant health risk. This prevents routine operations from taking place in the vicinity. Radiography was carried out over nine months but this only achieved around 50 per cent of the required work.

Aim
To inspect flexible hoses in a more cost and time effective manner while reducing personnel exposure to ionising radiations and spurious plant upsets.

Method

  • The Maersk Oil team engaged with innovative inspection specialist, Innospection, to investigate alternative techniques.
  • Innospection was already using Saturation Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), an electromagnetic technique, on subsea risers so the team worked to adapt this technique for the much smaller flexible hoses on Gryphon.
  • A bespoke tool, small enough to work successfully with the flexible hoses, was developed and tested onshore.
  • To test, an old section of flexible hose was intentionally damaged onshore to see if the tool picked up the discrepancy, which it did.

Impact

  • Developing the tool and validating the technique took around six months.
  • It was then trialled offshore on the Gryphon Alpha FPSO where it scanned all of the six-inch flexible hoses, around 40 per cent of the turret system, in just two weeks, providing better coverage while delivering the required image quality.
  • In the past, radiography was carried out over nine months of the year, but this only achieved around 50 per cent of the required work. The new tool has proven to be a much more efficient method.

Total time saved: Significantly reduced. Only two fortnightly trips are now required.

Total savings anticipated: Over 80 per cent over the next five years

Problem statement

Nexen sought to reduce offshore non-productive time (NPT) to drive greater efficiency of the platform supply vessel (PSV) fleet.

Aims

  • To reduce logistics NPT to below 30 per cent in 2015.
  • To manage logistic costs more effectively.

Method

  • Offshore teams were challenged to place greater emphasis on planning and scheduling to ensure the PSVs were working more efficiently.
  • Vessel NPT metrics were also examined which demonstrated that further cost management improvements could be implemented, including vessel sharing and ultimately reducing the PSV fleet.

Impact

  • The focus on reducing offshore NPT has enabled Nexen to challenge the manner in which it operates its PSV fleet and change entrenched ways of working.
  • This has resulted in the reduction of the PSV fleet by one term vessel and a reduction in dependency on
    ad hoc spot-hires.
  • It has resulted in annualised savings of £3.5-£4 million.
  • Further improvements to vessel sailing schedules have the potential to reduce the PSV fleet further, saving an additional £1.25-£1.5 million per annum.
  • Vessel savings were a major contributor in improving Nexen’s lifting costs in 2016.

Reduced NFT: 30%

Annualised savings: £3.5-4 million

East of England Energy Group – EEEGR

East of England Energy Group  works closely with major companies in the region and industry to ensure that tender and project opportunities are shared with members.

More information is available at http://www.eeegr.com/what-we-do.html#supply

NOF Energy

NOF Energy organises a range of events to help companies meet and discuss business opportunities.

More information is available at this link  here http://www.nofenergy.co.uk/n25-events.html

Scottish Enterprise

Department for International Trade

The UK Government’s Department for International Trade provides support for exporters and inward investors.

More information is available at this link here https://www.great.gov.uk/uk/

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

The Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy  provides information on support and finance for your business

More information is available at this link here – https://www.gov.uk/business-finance-support

Efficiency and Vision 2035 under spotlight at key industry conference

Collaboration and efficiency are becoming more commonplace in the mindset and vocabulary of the UK oil and gas industry, a key conference heard today.

The sector has worked hard over the last two years to bring efficiency to the fore, the Oil and Gas Industry Conference in Aberdeen was told.

While the approach to adapt to our new competitive reality was borne of “sheer necessity, in response to changing economic realities, Walter Thain, who chairs industry’s Efficiency Task Force (ETF) and is Managing Director of Petrofac, told the Oil & Gas UK event: “These new ways of working are starting to become embedded in our approach and it’s delivering results.”

Efficiency and its competitive advantage was one of the themes at the conference which also saw the launch of a new Efficiency Hub – on the Oil & Gas UK website – a one-stop shop for industry efficiency initiatives.

The new hub will encourage companies across the UK Continental Shelf to share examples of improvements made within their organisations, download and pilot efficiency ‘tools’ launched by the ETF, and keep abreast of the latest advances in industry efficiency.

Another key theme of conference was the huge potential of Vision 2035 – a £290-billion opportunity for the UK oil and gas industry that could extend the life of the basin and deliver a much-needed for boost the supply chain.

The First Minister for Scotland Nicola Sturgeon MSP – one of the conference keynote speakers – gave her backing to Oil & Gas UK’s blueprint for the next UK Government said the North Sea would continue to produce for decades to come.

Other areas of discussion at conference included the use of technology in industry and how other sectors are deploying big data and digitalisation to transform and reduce costs, the importance of supply chain collaboration on areas of skills to reduce duplication and ensure clarity and the role oil and gas can play in a low carbon future.

An investment stimulation session heard that that as mergers and acquisition activity continues, industry could expect more creativity from buyers and sellers to make the deal happen.

Elsewhere there were calls for the supply chain to diversify across the energy industry and not just service oil and gas. There was also appetite for a sector deal for the industry.

Conference was also told that industry had two choices when more activity returns to the basin – slip back into its old ways and old habits, or totally change its mindset.

Oil & Gas UK Chief Executive Deirdre Michie told conference in her opening address: “This time we have an opportunity to do things differently – especially if we remind ourselves that we have all been part of the problem and therefore we all need – including the cynics – to be part of the solution too.”

Almost 400 delegates attended the Aberdeen Exhibition and Conference Centre event which had Total as principal sponsor.

“The conference has demonstrated that we have a committed industry, and despite the issues it has to deal with, continues to strive to improve its competitiveness and sustain its contribution to the UK economy,” added Ms Michie.

Lokring – Retaining Non-Hazardous Areas without Welding

Submitted by Tom Brown, Technical Sales Manager.

Problem statement

  • A Northern North Sea asset had to replace a 2’’ stainless steel fuel gas system which ran through both hazardous and non-hazardous areas.
  • The system therefore had to be ‘fully welded’.
  • The only way they could do this under traditional methods was to weld the pipe on the platform.
  • This was not possible due to the spacing restrictions in this instance.

Aims

  • To replace the system as a fully welded one so the non-hazardous areas could remain this way, without actually welding on site.

 

Method

  • The operator had used Lokring before on fuel gas, but was not sure if it could be used on a fully welded system in a non-hazardous area without reclassifying the area as hazardous, as would have to be done when installing a flange.
  • To get confirmation, the operator contracted Xodus to carry out a study on whether a Lokring coupling could be used in this situation while maintaining the non-hazardous area classification.

Impact

  • The findings of the report confirm that;
  • ‘There is strong, well-supported justification for the use of LOKRING fittings in place of welded connections on the fuel gas system located in a non-hazardous area. The work completed for this study is judged to have suitably justified weld-equivalence for LOKRING fittings in non-hazardous areas, which by inference facilitates the support of their use in hazardous areas also.’

How does this relate to the Oil and Gas industry?

  • Traditionally, when installing fully welded pipework, the only option in non hazardous areas of a platform have been to weld on site.
  • This takes time, involves hot work permits, welders, habitats, fire watch and there is always the safety risk welding on site
  • This study has now provided another option to welding fully welded systems, while at the same time being quicker, safer and more cost effective.

 

SETS – Applying the Subsea Standardisation Principles to Subsea Structural Repairs

Submitted by Kevin Milne, Business Development & Brand Manager. 

Problem Statement

Utilisation of dive support vessels (DSVs) to fix and repair subsea structures on fixed assets is time sensitive, expensive and often inaccurate. Application of the principles of subsea standardisation/fit for purpose offers the potential to test interventions which do not involve DSVs.

Aims

  • Apply the principles of subsea standardisation to brace repairs and identify a fit-for-purpose approach.
  • De-risk an alternative intervention both commercially and technically in order to deliver the most efficient solution to meet the client’s requirement.
  • Reduce operational expenditure (OpEx) by challenging typical approach and methods.

 

Method

  • The SETS team worked with the project team early on to review the project scope and applied the standardisation principles to identify opportunities for improvement. The scope was then revisited and re-worked with a more realistic consideration of risk.
  • A focus on commercial risk was introduced.

Impact

Early involvement and application of a standardised/’fit-for-purpose’ approach resulted in:

  • Elimination of non-productive time
  • Consideration of all technical and commercial contingencies before the DSV left the harbour wall
  • Reduction of DSV requirement by 11 days
  • Work-scope successfully delivered with considerable cost and time savings.

Total hours saved: 264

Total savings anticipated: £1m +

Maersk Oil – Engineering a unique solution

Problem statement

Correcting the slippage of buoyancy modules on the Global Producer III FPSO vessel’s risers without replacing the riser or carrying out a planned shutdown is an extremely expensive and risky operation.  The challenge was to find a way to correct this slippage whilst keeping the riser in operation, something that hadn’t been done before.

Aim

To correct the buoyancy module slippage in a targeted manner using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV), allowing us to move away from conducting saturation diving operations and also engineer a solution that could be implemented whilst in operation.

 

Method

  • The Maersk Oil team engaged with SubC Partner, inventor and owner of the technical solution. Over six months, the team created a bespoke tool that connected to an ROV.
  • The tool had to be specifically designed for the task because there were a number of specific requirements.
  • It had to work underwater while connected to the ROV, dock onto the riser and remove the old buoyancy module and inner clamp. It had then to bring the old parts to the surface, pick up the new clamp and module and go back down to the riser to install the new parts.
  • The new clamp was also installed with rubber compliant pads to stop future slippage, a technique already effectively used by Maersk Oil.

Impact

  • Replacing the buoyancy modules on a live riser system had never successfully been completed before. The Maersk Oil team met this challenge head on and in collaboration with SubC Partner, a bespoke tool was developed to replace the buoyancy modules, correcting the slippage.
  • The solution avoided the need to replace the whole riser, an extremely expensive and risky operation, and also meant that the riser could be kept in operation during the replacement, resulting in no production loss.
  • By using a tool docked onto an ROV the need for saturation diving personnel was eradicated, reducing the risk to human life.
  • The installation of rubber compliant pads on the inner clamp helps prevent future slippage.
  • Replacing the buoyancy modules is more efficient compared to the alternative of replacing the riser entirely; there was no impact to production and the solution saw around 80% savings compared to alternative method. This solution has been shared at a Society for Underwater Technology (SUT) lecture.

Total hours saved: No significant saving

Total savings anticipated: Solution cost approx. 20% of the average fee of replacing a riser, around 80% saving.

Wood Group – Alternative Access Solutions

Submitted by Philip Oliver, Transformational Change Manager. 

Problem statement

Inclement weather, intermittent accessibility and poor control of environment can negatively affect schedule and drive up costs for planned/unplanned activities. Inflexible access solutions are a significant factor that contributes to delays in these scenarios.

Aims

  • Develop an optimised approach to each access situation that ensures safety and maximises tool time.
  • Assure greater integrity and reliability by creating a consistent environment.
  • Challenge conventional approaches to access solutions.

 

 

Method

Each scope is approached with a thorough and detailed focus on identifying the optimum solutions, considering aspects that include the work environment, the nature of the work, avoiding working at height, workface planning, remote operated aerial vehicle (ROAV) usage and area cover. The purchasing of multiple ‘Safezone’ positive pressure habitats ensures that we are not bottlenecked on resources and rapidly deploy the system on our clients’ assets when required.

Impact

Through challenging conventional approaches to access solutions we were able to ensure significant savings on material cost, improved safety and increased tool time.  Project successes have included an 85 percent saving on the inspection of 143 pipe supports and £1.68 million client saving  when using a remote operated aerial vehicle (ROAV) instead of rope access solutions. The use of a ROAV also allowed for avoidance of a three-week shutdown, scaffolding, rope access and over-side working

Total hours saved: Three-week shutdown

Total savings anticipated: £1.68m

Wood Group – Innovative Flange Management when Decommissioning

Submitted by Philip Oliver, Transformational Change Manager.

Problem Statement

Breaking flanges to physically isolate systems when decommissioning is time intensive and introduces the risk of disturbing asbestos present in compressed asbestos fibre (CAF) type gaskets

Aims

  • Reduce personnel asbestos exposure and minimise the requirement for asbestos removal specialists when breaking flanges during decommissioning.
  • Reduce the time required for providing positive isolations during decommissioning.

Method

To solve the issue, our decommissioning services contract proposed using  the Springlynn system, a self-tapping saddle for draining and venting systems adopted from the water industry.

Impact

The system has been simple to use and can be deployed by someone with no previous training. It removes the need to break flanges but ensures that re-energisation of the pipeline cannot occur. The system eliminates potential risk of exposure from asbestos fibre (CAF) gaskets.

Agilis – Sharing knowledge effectively

Submitted by Lakshan Saldin

Problem statement

Multinational project needed to run workshop to review issues and  uncertainties with participants from multiple nationalities and across multiple specialisms, taking as little time as possible.

 

Aims

Develop a comprehensive, shared picture of project risk and uncertainty across a diverse group of participants and identify the critical factors affecting project within a very short timescale.

Method

Developed a workshop combining elements of the Delphi technique for developing consensus in expert groups with  an agile estimating methodology to gather diverse views.

Participants worked through a list of keywords and “played” a numbered card for each one, low numbers indicated an insignificant issue and high numbers a significant issue. For issues flagged as significant by one or more participants, a simple consensus based process was used to agree and capture outcomes. Initial output was available the same day.

Impact

The multinational, multilingual project team was able to challenge assumptions, recognise cognitive bias (e.g. anchoring, groupthink) and develop a shared understanding of project issues in a low conflict environment.

Material uncertainties affecting project delivery were identified early on and incorporated into execution plan.

Improved understanding of issues/threats through introduction of new information & perspectives.

Short duration enable participation from normally difficult to get hold of individuals.

Be a champion

Oil & Gas Authority (OGA)- Asset Stewardship

Get involved

Wood group – Rising to the late-life asset maintenance challenge

Submitted by Philip Oliver (Transformational Change Manager)

Problem statement

Keeping costs of maintaining ageing assets under
control prior to cessation of production (CoP), while maintaining integrity.

Aims

  • Evaluate work scopes to offer alternative solutions to client’s benefit.
  • Reduce maintenance scope of various projects in a late-life asset management context.

Method

As part of ongoing evaluation of work scopes, a
thorough review was carried out of a fabric maintenance programme to maintain platform integrity. Two opportunities were identified to either reduce or remove the painting scope. The proposed reduction required engagement with the client’s technical authorities to agree to a deviation on painting standards, which are written for operating assets and are not always appropriate for assets coming to the end of their field life.

Impact

A 42 per cent reduction in work scope was realised. The drilling derrick painting scope was reduced considerably by using wax oil instead of normal paint. As this took less time to complete, the job could be carried out during a planned drilling outage, saving an additional £1,120,000 (cost of drilling downtime for original scope).

Total days saved: 27

Total savings anticipated: £2.16m

 

Inventory Management Tools

Inventory Management Tools

Guidelines – Inventory Management Good Practice

Coming soon – estimated 2017

Register your interest

Business Outlook

Maersk Oil – Optimising to remove risk: 80 per cent cost saving on inspection of flexible hoses

Problem Statement
An alternative method for inspecting flexible hoses on the Gryphon Alpha Floating Production Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel’s turret, which removes the need to use radiography was needed. Radiography cannot be carried out in the direction of the asset’s nucleonic detectors as this will trip the high-integrity pressure protection system (HIPPS) and cause an unplanned production outage. The entire turret area needs to be shut off to personnel during scanning as it poses a significant health risk. This prevents routine operations from taking place in the vicinity. Radiography was carried out over nine months but this only achieved around 50 per cent of the required work.

Aim
To inspect flexible hoses in a more cost and time effective manner while reducing personnel exposure to ionising radiations and spurious plant upsets.

Method

  • The Maersk Oil team engaged with innovative inspection specialist, Innospection, to investigate alternative techniques.
  • Innospection was already using Saturation Low Frequency Eddy Current (SLOFEC), an electromagnetic technique, on subsea risers so the team worked to adapt this technique for the much smaller flexible hoses on Gryphon.
  • A bespoke tool, small enough to work successfully with the flexible hoses, was developed and tested onshore.
  • To test, an old section of flexible hose was intentionally damaged onshore to see if the tool picked up the discrepancy, which it did.

Impact

  • Developing the tool and validating the technique took around six months.
  • It was then trialled offshore on the Gryphon Alpha FPSO where it scanned all of the six-inch flexible hoses, around 40 per cent of the turret system, in just two weeks, providing better coverage while delivering the required image quality.
  • In the past, radiography was carried out over nine months of the year, but this only achieved around 50 per cent of the required work. The new tool has proven to be a much more efficient method.

Total time saved: Significantly reduced. Only two fortnightly trips are now required.

Total savings anticipated: Over 80 per cent over the next five years

Nexen – Driving greater efficiency of platform supply vessel fleet through controlling offshore non-productive time

Problem statement

Nexen sought to reduce offshore non-productive time (NPT) to drive greater efficiency of the platform supply vessel (PSV) fleet.

Aims

  • To reduce logistics NPT to below 30 per cent in 2015.
  • To manage logistic costs more effectively.

Method

  • Offshore teams were challenged to place greater emphasis on planning and scheduling to ensure the PSVs were working more efficiently.
  • Vessel NPT metrics were also examined which demonstrated that further cost management improvements could be implemented, including vessel sharing and ultimately reducing the PSV fleet.

Impact

  • The focus on reducing offshore NPT has enabled Nexen to challenge the manner in which it operates its PSV fleet and change entrenched ways of working.
  • This has resulted in the reduction of the PSV fleet by one term vessel and a reduction in dependency on
    ad hoc spot-hires.
  • It has resulted in annualised savings of £3.5-£4 million.
  • Further improvements to vessel sailing schedules have the potential to reduce the PSV fleet further, saving an additional £1.25-£1.5 million per annum.
  • Vessel savings were a major contributor in improving Nexen’s lifting costs in 2016.

Reduced NFT: 30%

Annualised savings: £3.5-4 million

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